BDEW: Germany Remains Electricity Exporter, But Imports Increase Significantly

Germany remained an electricity exporter during the first half of 2011. However, electricity imports significantly increased, the Federal Association of the Energy and Water Industry (BDEW) reported.

In the first half of 2011, Germany exported roughly 29 billion kWh compared to 31 billion kWh in the same period last year, BDEW said. Imports rose significantly from 20 billion kWh to 25 billion kWh, leading to an export surplus of 4 billion kWh after a surplus of 11 billion kWh in the first half of 2010. Hence Germany’s electricity import/export balance is still positive, despite the recent energy turnaround, albeit to a much lower degree than in the past. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident, Germany amended the Atomic Energy Act (AtG), stipulating a staggered phase-out of nuclear energy and the immediate shutdown of eight nuclear power plants.

Imports mainly came from France (42%) and the Czech Republic (22%), while most of Germany’s exports went to Austria (27%) and Switzerland (25%), BDEW said.

Source: BDEW

 

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2 Responses to “BDEW: Germany Remains Electricity Exporter, But Imports Increase Significantly”


  • I don’t agree that “Germany’s electricity import/export balance is still positive, despite the recent energy turnaround.”
    Using the data from Entso > resources > data portal >exchange,
    The figures are similar, but it is possible to break out the early months (the 1st quarer having an 8 TWh net export), from the 2nd quarter, which is negative, 3.5TWh.

    I’ts the first time I’ve located the Entso interface, but it seems to show a turnaround to net importer status.

  • Thank you a million Scott Luft. That Entso database is awesome. I’m writing my thesis and i have been having tremendous issues with getting data from myriad sources. Entso sums it all.

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